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The California Coastal Coalition (CalCoast)  is a non-profit advocacy group comprised of 35 coastal cities; five counties; SANDAG, BEACON and SCAG; private sector partners and NGOs, committed to protecting and restoring California's coastline through beach sand restoration, increasing the flow of natural sediment to the coast, wetlands recovery, improved water quality, watershed management and the reduction of marine debris and plastic pollution.

CalCoast has sponsored or supported legislation, budget requests and bond measures (Propositions 12, 13, 40, 50 and 84) that have raised billions of dollars in state and federal funding for beaches, wetlands, clean water and parks. In 1999, we sponsored the California Public Beach Restoration Act (AB 64-Ducheny), which created the state’s first fund for beach nourishment projects.
Committed to Restoring California's 
Coastline
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What's New

Editor's Notes - August 22, 2014

by Steve Aceti on 08/22/14

In a rare display of bipartisanship and cooperation among legislators and the governor, last week the governor signed legislation (AB 1471) which replaces the current $11.1 billion water bond on the November ballot with a $7.5 billion water bond.    

 

The bond provides for water use efficiency and recycling, groundwater cleanup and management and funding additional water storage. The water bond also includes funds for safe drinking water, watershed restoration, and increased flows in rivers and streams. An outline of the final bond can be found here

 

The Legislature has until the end of the month to consider hundreds of bills, including SB 1168 (regulation of groundwater), SB 270 (a statewide ban on single-use plastic shopping bags), AB 2516 (creation of a sea level rise database) and AB 1169 (ban on plastic micro beads). We'll keep everyone posted on the progress of important bills.

 

Highlights (or lowlights) from the articles and information below:

 

  • Sen. Hueso arrested for DUI
  • Suspended lawmakers to continue receiving pay
  • Martins Beach access bill passes - headed to governor
  • Land conservancy seeks to buy Pismo Preserve
  • City of Encinitas passes plastic bag ban
  • Three cities may nix elections
  • State releases report on sea level rise
     
TGIF!

Editor's Notes - August 1, 2014

by Steve Aceti on 08/01/14

The Legislature will reconvene from its summer recess Aug. 4 and it has until the end of August to deal with roughly 1,100 bills. The governor then has until the end of September to sign or veto bills sent to him by the Legislature.

In light of the state's worsening drought, two bills that have gained a lot of momentum are SB 1168 by Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, and AB 1739 by Assemblymember Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento.

The bills would empower local agencies to regulate groundwater and require that they develop groundwater management plans. California is the only western state that doesn't manage groundwater and levels are shrinking quickly as other sources of water become more scarce. SB 1168 is in Assembly Appropriations (no hearing date set). AB 1739 will be heard in Senate Appropriations August 11. For more information, including bill text and staff analyses, log onto leginfo.ca.gov, click on "Bill Information," and enter the bill number in the "Search" window.

 

Highlights (or lowlights) from the articles and other information posted below:

 

  • Statewide restrictions on water use take effect today.
  • Drought takes a toll on salmon
  • New apps target water wasters
  • Drought could affect craft beer production and flavor
  • Drought is top environmental concern among Californians
  • Sen. Yee pleads not guilty to racketeering charges.
  • State has burned through more than 25% of firefighting budget
  • After refusal, PUC releases, report on failure of nuclear reactors at SONGS   
  • Coastal Commission seeks public input on Martin's Beach
  • Video: Sea-level rise and its impact on Southern California Beaches
  • State Water Board hearings and workshop (August 5-6)

 

TGIF!

Editor's Notes - July 25, 2014

by Steve Aceti on 07/25/14

California’s drought and ways to deal with it continue to dominate the news articles posted below. The governor’s call for a voluntary 20% reduction in water use is not being heeded. Water use in most regions is up over last year, especially in the state’s southern region.
 

Last week the State Water Resources Control Board approved watering restrictions, effective August 1st, that could result in civil fines of up to $500 per day. The restrictions apply to homeowners, businesses, and public agencies. Enforcement will come from people calling local water agencies to report violations.
 

The drought doesn’t show any signs of improving - in fact many experts predict that it is getting worse. For its part, the San Diego County Water Authority has joined other water agencies across the state in approving mandatory water restrictions. Many reservoirs and other sources of potable water are at all-time lows and attention has turned to rapidly diminishing levels of groundwater. Ironically, California is the only western state that doesn’t manage groundwater but SB 1168, authored by Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills), could change that by empowering local agencies to develop groundwater management plans.
 


Expect to see more action by state, regional and local agencies as California continues to experience historically high temperatures and low water supplies. In the meantime, check out state and local rebate programs for water efficient toilets, washing machines, and irrigation systems, as well as turf replacement projects.

 

Highlights (or lowlights) from the articles and other information posted below:

 

  • Can water districts raise taxes without a public vote?
  • Drought putting salmon at risk in Klamath Basin
  • Major reservoirs are below 50% capacity.
  • State has little say over oil train safety
  • Do California’s environmental policies weaken its business climate?
  • Island of debris found off California Coast
  • Hefty fines for people who block beach access
     
TGIF!

Editor's Notes - July 18, 2014

by Steve Aceti on 07/18/14

Coastal Stakeholders: Please join the California Coastal Sediment Management Workgroup co-chaired by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and California National Resources Agency for the California Coastal Sediment Master Plan, Outreach and Plan Formulation Stakeholder Meeting 2.  The meeting will be held on Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm at the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) office (8th Floor Board Room) located at 401 B Street in San Diego, California. 

The overall purpose of the meeting is to obtain input from coastal stakeholders regarding how best to pull together existing regional sediment management plans into a state-wide sediment master plan.  Please note that lunch will not be provided so plan accordingly. Please RSVP to David Cannon at david.cannon@everestconsultants.com by Friday, July 25. More information about the California Coastal Sediment Master Plan is available online

Editor's Notes - July 11, 2014

by Steve Aceti on 07/11/14

PowerPoint presentations given at this year's Headwaters to Ocean (H2O) Conference have been added to the conference website and may be reviewed here.

   

The H2O website contains PowerPoint presentations dating back to 2003. We wish to thank all the presenters who participated in this year's conference, as well as our sponsors, exhibitors, and registrants.

Coastal Stakeholders: Please join the California Coastal Sediment Management Workgroup co-chaired by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and California National Resources Agency for the California Coastal Sediment Master Plan, Outreach and Plan Formulation Stakeholder Meeting 2.  The meeting will be held on Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm at the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) office (8th Floor Board Room) located at 401 B Street in San Diego, California. 

The overall purpose of the meeting is to obtain input from coastal stakeholders regarding how best to pull together existing regional sediment management plans into a state-wide sediment master plan.  Please note that lunch will not be provided so plan accordingly. Please RSVP to David Cannon at david.cannon@everestconsultants.com by Friday, July 25. More information about the California Coastal Sediment Master Plan is available online.

California is in a drought emergency. Visit www.SaveOurH2O.org for water conservation tips.