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The California Coastal Coalition (CalCoast)  is a non-profit advocacy group comprised of 35 coastal cities; five counties; SANDAG, BEACON and SCAG; private sector partners and NGOs, committed to protecting and restoring California's coastline through beach sand restoration, increasing the flow of natural sediment to the coast, wetlands recovery, improved water quality, watershed management and the reduction of marine debris and plastic pollution.

CalCoast has sponsored or supported legislation, budget requests and bond measures (Propositions 12, 13, 40, 50 and 84) that have raised billions of dollars in state and federal funding for beaches, wetlands, clean water and parks. In 1999, we sponsored the California Public Beach Restoration Act (AB 64-Ducheny), which created the state’s first fund for beach nourishment projects.
Committed to Restoring California's 
Coastline
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What's New

September 30, 2016

by Steve Aceti on 09/30/16

This writer was a political science major and a history minor, so maybe like you, I just can’t look away when it comes to the ongoing (2 years and counting) presidential election. They say politics makes for odd bedfellows, and having been around politics for more than (ouch) 38 years, I think this year’s race could be the poster child for that proposition. For example, The Donald insulted Ted Cruz, but Cruz endorsed him anyway. In addition, The Donald insulted Rubio, but Rubio endorsed him anyway. Trump fires his campaign manager, but a few days later, he’s an analyst on CNN.

 

But here’s a shocker: Earlier today, The San Diego Union-Tribune endorsed a Democrat for president. The last time that happened was 146 years ago. We’re not choosing sides, just sayin’.

Editor's Notes - September 23, 2016

by Steve Aceti on 09/23/16

1. Important Coastal Bill passes Senate with Focus on Coastal Resilience
 
Last week, the U.S. Senate passed S.2848, the Water Resource Development Act (WRDA), which includes many provisions to help protect, restore, and increase the resilience of U.S. coastlines, including beach restoration projects. The bill passed 95-3, with overwhelming bipartisan support. The House of Representatives must now act for the bill to move to the President's desk. See press release below from the American Shore & Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA). We appreciate being kept up-to-date by ASBPA as this essential legislation makes its way through Congress. Kudos also go out to the Coastal States Association for its work on the bill.  
 
2. Annual Coastal Clean-up Day

Thanks go out to all who participated in last Saturday's annual Coastal Clean-Up Day. As in the past, there were thousands of volunteers who kept tons of trash, cigarette butts, refrigerators, etc. More information about last week's event is available here.
 
3. Subscription Model for the WAVE Begins Next Month
 
CalCoast was founded in 1997. By the end of 1998, we had roughly the same number of members we currently have. One of the most popular things we have done is to publish the WAVE - since 1998. However, the cost of scouring the state's newspapers and other sources of information on a daily basis, drafting the newsletter, laying it out, publishing it and posting it online has risen over the years, so we will need to adopt a paid subscription model to help underwrite the expenses of creating and circulating the WAVE. We can no longer offer the WAVE as a free publication. (Our local government members are already struggling, so an increase in dues to help underwrite the cost of this newsletter is not a viable option.)
 
The WAVE will be available to all current subscribers until the end of September. At that time, we will be charging $9.95 per month, but we will have a new, improved newsletter, including important information from each month's Coastal Commission meeting. We've had a great response to our subscription model and we appreciate everyone's support. We hope you'll stay with us and we are confident that you will benefit greatly from continuing to read this newsletter.

Editor's Notes - September 16, 2016

by Steve Aceti on 09/16/16

1. Important Coastal Bill passes Senate with Focus on Coastal Resilience
 
On Thursday, the U.S. Senate passed S.2848, the Water Resource Development Act (WRDA), which includes many provisions to help protect, restore, and increase the resilience of U.S. coastlines. The bill passed 95-3, with overwhelming bipartisan support. The House of Representatives must now act for the bill to move to the President's desk. See press release below from the American Shore & Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA). We appreciate being kept up-to-date by ASBPA as this essential legislation makes its way through Congress. Kudos also go out to the Coastal States Association for its work on the bill.

2. Fun Facts from the Presidential (?) Campaign
 
Ever wonder what happens to all the millions failed candidates collected during the primary? Not surprisingly, they get to keep the funds, which can be used in a variety of ways: another political campaign (self), someone else's campaign, charity, a PAC, and Congressional campaign committees. Below is a breakdown of how much the candidates who were munched by Trump and how much Bernie still have on-hand (as of July 31st):  
 
Bernie Sanders: $6 million ($1.1 million was collected after Bernie conceded to Clinton)
 
Bush Super PAC (Right to Rise) $3 million
 
Rubio: Transferred $800,000 to his campaign for U.S. Senate
 
Paul: Two pro-Paul super PACs have more than $2 million combined
 
Most of the other also-rans have six figure accounts.
 
Due to the rancor and just plain weird GOP primary, there's a consensus among pundits that former Prez candidates and the PACs that supported them will most likely sit on the money until the next Prez election. This writer would like to have just the interest from the surplus funds!
 
3. Annual Coastal Clean-up Day
 
Do your part to keep the coast clean and have fun doing it tomorrow during the annual Coastal Clean-Up Day. More information is available here.
 
4. Subscription Model for the WAVE Begins Next Month
 
CalCoast was founded in 1997. By the end of 1998, we had roughly the same number of members we currently have. One of the most popular things we have done is to publish the WAVE - since 1998. However, the cost of scouring the state's newspapers and other sources of information on a daily basis, drafting the newsletter, laying it out, publishing it and posting it online has risen over the years, so we will need to adopt a paid subscription model to help underwrite the expenses of creating and circulating the WAVE. We can no longer offer the WAVE as a free publication. (Our local government members are already struggling, so an increase in dues to help underwrite the cost of this newsletter is not a viable option.)
 
The WAVE will be available to all current subscribers until the end of September. At that time, we will be charging $9.95 per month, but we will have a new, improved newsletter, including important information from each month's Coastal Commission meeting. We've had a great response to our subscription model and we appreciate everyone's support. We hope you'll stay with us and we are confident that you will benefit greatly from continuing to read this newsletter.

Editor's Notes - September 2, 2016

by Steve Aceti on 09/02/16

1. Pay Model for the WAVE Begins Next Month

CalCoast was founded in 1997. By the end of 1998, we had roughly the same number of members we currently have. One of the most popular things we have done is to publish the WAVE. However, the cost of scouring the state's newspapers and other sources of information on a daily basis, drafting the newsletter, laying it out publishing it and and posting it online has risen over the years, so we will need to adopt a paid subscription model to help underwrite the expenses of creating and circulating the WAVE. We can no longer offer the WAVE as a free publication. (Our local government members are already struggling, so an increase in dues to help underwrite the cost of this newsletter is not a viable option.)

The WAVE will be available to all current subscribers until sometime in September. At that time, we will be charging $9.95 per month, but we will have a new, improved newsletter, including important information from each month's Coastal Commission meeting. We hope you'll stay with us and we are confident that you will benefit greatly from continuing to read this newsletter. 

2. Update re Coastal Commission Legislation 

Last week, we told our subscribers that AB 2002 (Stone) was sent to the Senate Rules Committee where it would probably die and it looks like that will be the case. AB 2002 would have required applicants and their consultants to register as lobbyists and it would have prevented ex Parte communications with coastal commissioners within 24 hours of a hearing.

SB 1190 died on the Senate floor, weighed down by a flurry of amendments over the past couple of weeks. Technically, SB 1190 is now a two-year bill, but two-year bills, which need to be acted on by the Legislature by the end of February the year after the bill was introduced, don't have the best track record in terms of passage. Usually, two-year bills are viewed by many lawmakers as damaged goods, but the bill could be re-introduced next year with a different number. More information on these and other bills (history, current status, staff analyses and text of the bill with tracked changes) is available at http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/. Click on "Bill Information", then type the bill number or author in the search window.

We wish everyone a happy and safe holiday!

Editor's Notes - August 26, 2016

by Steve Aceti on 08/26/16

1. Pay Model for the WAVE Begins Next Month

CalCoast was founded in 1997. By the end of 1998, we had roughly the same number of members we currently have. One of the most popular things we have done is to publish the WAVE. However, the cost of scouring the state's newspapers and other sources of information on a daily basis, drafting the newsletter, laying it out publishing it and and posting it online has risen over the years, so we will need to adopt a paid subscription model to help underwrite the expenses of creating and circulating the WAVE. We can no longer offer the WAVE as a free publication. (Our local government members are already struggling, so an increase in dues to help underwrite the cost of this newsletter is not a viable option.)

The WAVE will be available to all current subscribers until sometime in September. At that time, we will be charging $9.95 per month, but we will have a new, improved newsletter, including important information from each month's Coastal Commission meeting. We hope you'll stay with us and we are confident that you will benefit greatly from continuing to read this newsletter. 

2. Update re Coastal Commission Legislation 

Last week, we told our subscribers that AB 2002 (Stone) was sent to the Senate Rules Committee where it would probably die and it looks like that will be the case. AB 2002 would have required applicants and their consultants to register as lobbyists and it would have prevented ex Parte communications with coastal commissioners within 24 hours of a hearing.

Now the focus is on SB 1190 (Jackson), which has taken some significant amendments and currently sits in the Assembly Appropriations Committee. I'm hearing the bill yesterday was postponed. Next weekend is the last week of this legislative session and it is anticipated that SB 1190 will be heard Monday or Tuesday next week. Amendments have been taken that create a significant physical impact, so if the bill eventually passes, there's a good chance that Governor will veto it. Basically, the amendment required the commission to develop a fairly expensive phone and Internet access system for the public. For information about the new amendments and the status of the bill, go to www.leginfo.ca.gov and enter the bill number in the search window. Or, contact Jennifer Galehouse, who wrote the most recent (August 24) staff analysis for the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

TGIF!
 

California is in a drought emergency. Visit www.SaveOurH2O.org for water conservation tips.